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Statue of the week: number 56

June 3, 2012

We journey along Karl Johans gate this week from Universitetsplassen to Eidsvolls plass outside the Stortinget (the parliament building – a literal translation is “the big thing”). Here to the right hand side of Eidsvolls plass when facing the Stortinget stands a statue of Carl Joachim Hambro (1885 – 1964).  CJ Hambro was a journalist, author and Conservative politician , serving as a member of the Stortinget for 38 years.  He understood what Hitler had in mind for Norway and organised the escape of King Haakon VII, the Royal family, and the government on a train that left 30 minutes before the Germans arrived in Oslo.

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Statue of the week: number 55

June 3, 2012

Back to Universitetsplassen this time and to the companion of Anton M Schweigaard.  This is Peter Andreas Munch (1810 – 1863) – no, it’s not that Munch this is a different one!  Peter Andreas Munch was a school friend of Anton Schweigaard, but is known for his work on Norwegian medieval history. He was also one of the first non-catholics to gain access to the Vatican’s archives.

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Statue of the week: 54

June 3, 2012

The University of Oslo used to be based in downtown Oslo but now only the Faculty of Law remains in the original buildings, with the rest of the University located at Blindern (which has been developed since the 1930’s).  The university was founded in 1811 and was modeled on the University of Copenhagen and the University of Berlin. Until 1946 it was the only university in Norway.  In front of the original buildings (Domus Bibliotheca, Domus Media and Domus Academica) on Universitetsplassen stand two statues.

Statue 54 is of Anton M. Schweigaard (1808 – 1870) who was a professor of jurisprudence and economics in the 1830s and 1840s.  He helped Norway to become a capitalist economy and served as a member of parliament from 1842 – 1869.

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Statue of the week: number 53

June 3, 2012

This is another one that you could easily miss.  She’s tucked down a passage (Sehesteds gate) just off the route of tramlines 11, 17 and 18.  The statue is also a fountain and is called Evig Liv or in English Eternal Life.

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It was sculpted by Ørnulf Bast (1907 – 1974) in 1948/49 and is one of several works of public art by Bast. During the Second World Ward Bast and his wife, also provided a secret flat for the Norwegian Resistance Movement.  He was awarded the King’s Medal of Merit.

Statue of the week: number 52

June 3, 2012

Here is a statue that is very close to statues of the week 48 – 51 but he’s quite easy to miss if you’re walking towards the centre of Oslo down Tullins gate. Turn right (as if you’re going to the Radisson Blu Hotel car park) and he’s there just past the traffic lights.  His name is Olaf Bull (1883 – 1933) and he is a Norwegian poet.  His most well known poem is Metope.

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Statue of the week: number 51

March 18, 2012

The final man in the group of four is Andreas Munch (1811 – 1884). Andreas was a poet and he wrote the words to accompany Kjerulf’s music Brudeferd i Hardanger.  He is buried in Vår Frelsers gravlund, as are Halfdan Kjerulf, and Hans Gude.

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Statue of the week: number 50

March 18, 2012

Hans Gude (1825 – 1903) painted Brudeferd i Hardanger together wth Adolph Tideman in 1848.  He studied abroad, like many other painters, but due to revolutionary events in Europe both Gude and Tideman were back in Norway.

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